FOOD SCIENCE: PERCEPTION, PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION - 2017/8

Module code: BMS2042

Module provider

School of Biosciences and Medicine

Module Leader

BROWN J Dr (Biosc & Med)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 5

JACs code

D610

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 1

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 118

Lecture Hours: 29

Tutorial Hours: 2

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework COURSEWORK - 1 PAGE ESSAY PLAN 10%
Coursework COURSEWORK - PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT EXERCISE 30%
Examination EXAMINATION - ESSAY QUESTIONS - 120 MINUTES 60%

Alternative Assessment

N/A

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

BMS1027 Food Science and Nutrition

Module overview

The aim of this module is to build upon the basic food science concepts introduced in BMS 1027 (FHEQ 4 Food Science) and to  give the students an in depth understanding of key aspects of food science including browning reactions, the perception of food, the use of additives, and food spoilage and preservation. It is an important component of the nutrition and dietetics programs, as it links these to the study of food and its chemistry. 

Module aims

Examine three key browning reactions which might occur during commercial processing and storage and/or institutional and domestic food preparation.

Provide an appreciation of Maillard reaction, including the basic chemistry and particularly its significance in determining food acceptability

Provide an appreciation of the important role of ascorbate as an additive in food and to examine its degradation and browning reactions

Provide an appreciation of the behaviour of natural pigments and to contrast these with synthetic dyes used as additives

Provide an appreciation of the mechanisms of taste and smell and how these influence food choice

Provide an appreciation of the regulatory and technological classification of food additives and their roles in food

Provide an appreciation of the effects of food processing and domestic/institutional food preparation on the nutrient and anti-nutrient content of foods

Provide an appreciation of the types and causes of food spoilage, and the scientific principles utilised in the safe preservation of foods

Provide a brief introduction to functional foods and genetically modified foods and to discuss their potential future applications

Give students the opportunity to put their learning into practice using a product development exercise in which they seek to develop food science solutions to produce an improved product

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Illustrate and describe (with simple formulae and equations) the basic reactions of non-enzymic browning (Maillard reaction, caramelisation, ascorbate degradation)
Explain, giving examples, how these reactions influence food acceptability, for better or worse, via changes in colour, odour, nutrient retention, etc. KT
Compare and contrast natural pigments with synthetic dyes for colouring processed foods. KC
Understand the mechanisms of taste and smell and how these influence food choice. K
Classify food additives by function giving examples of additives and applications including an explanation of the mechanism(s) by which they function KC
Explain the factors that influence nutrient and anti-nutrient loss and destruction during food processing/preparation and storage, and place this in a dietary perspective KT
Explain the physical, chemical and biochemical mechanisms underlying food preservation and how deleterious changes can be minimised. KT
Understand the concepts of novel foods and genetically modified foods, and the benefits and concerns associated with these. K
To be able to apply their understanding of food science to solve real problems and to develop new products. KCPT

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative content includes:
• Changes in colour, odour and flavour formation during cooking and processing: the contribution of the Browning Reactions. 
• The Maillard Reaction: Introduction and early reactions
• The Maillard Reaction: Later reactions & its control
• Ascorbate: uses, degradation and browning
• The caramelisation of sugars: browning reactions and applications 
• Natural pigments - changes during food processing.  Chlorophyll and animal haem pigments
• Carotenoid pigments
• Anthocyanins, Betalains and minor pigments
• Synthetic colours, natural extracts, applications, advantages, legislation
• An introduction to the tastes of food
• An introduction to the smell of food
• Food additives 1: introduction and classification on functional basis
• Food additives 2: intense and bulk sweeteners
• Food additives 3: miscellaneous additives and legislation
• Food Additives 4:gums and stabilisers
• Food Additives 5: gums and stabilisers
• Effects of processing on the nutritional properties of foods: introduction
• Effects of processing on the nutritional properties of foods: vitamins
• Effects of processing on the nutritional properties of foods: proteins
• Effects of processing on the nutritional properties of foods: lipids, carbohydrates & real examples
• Tutorial: Feedback and discussion of exam plan coursework
• Food preservation 1: introduction to chemical, physical and microbial spoilage
• Food preservation 2: chemical food spoilage and its prevention
• Food preservation 3: microbial food spoilage and factors influencing it
• Food preservation 4  prevention of microbial spoilage
• Food preservation  5, 6, 7:  fruit and vegetables - molecular changes
during ripening of fruit; synthesis of ethene; controlled and modified atmosphere storage and packaging to extend shelf-life
• Functional foods
• Genetically modified foods
• Tutorial on past examination papers
• Tutorial: feed back and discussion on product development exercise

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to: build upon the basic food science concepts introduced in BMS 1027 (FHEQ 4 Food Science) and to  give the students an in depth understanding of key aspects of food science including browning reactions, the perception of food, the use of additives, and food spoilage and preservation. These are key areas of FHEQ5 Food Science and link nutrition and dietetics to the production of food

The learning and teaching methods include:
• Lectures 1 h x 30 weeks, + 2 h
• Preparation of a product development report

 

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate: their understanding of and key areas of food science, and their ability to interrelate these, by the preparation of product development report. Understanding is also assessed by the preparation of a one page exam plan and by a written 2 h examination (4 questions from a choice of seven).

 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:

 

·         One page essay plan on a previous exam question (week 5) 10%

·         Product development exercise (week 10) 30%

·         Two hour written examination (4 questions from a choice of 7) 60%

·          

Formative assessment and feedback

Students prepare a one page exam plan on a previous exam question and  receive extensive written feedback on this so they gain the oppurtunity learn the expected detail and content of an answer.  There are also a number of specific revision and feedback tutorials for formative assessment. 

Reading list

Reading list for FOOD SCIENCE: PERCEPTION, PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/bms2042

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.