HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I - 2017/8

Module code: ELI1018

Module provider

School of Literature and Languages

Module Leader

BRIDGES VR Dr (Lit & Langs)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 4

JACs code

Q320

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

100

Module Availability

Semester 1

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 128

Lecture Hours: 10

Seminar Hours: 10

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework ESSAY (1500 WORDS) 75%
Coursework SELF-EVALUATIVE REPORT (TO BE SUBMITTED ALONGSIDE ESSAY) (500 WORDS) 25%

Alternative Assessment

N/A Seminar discussion (formative) and group presentation (formative; 10 minutes). Formative ‘feed forward’ will be provided by seminar tutors as responses to class discussions and to the presentations undertaken.

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

None This module has a capped number and may not be available to ERASMUS and other international exchange students. Please check with the departmental exchange coordinator.

Module overview

This module introduces students to the main periods in literary history from the Medieval period to the late Eighteenth Century by examining some key texts from these periods. Students will study texts in English from the Medieval period, the Early Modern period, the Restoration, and the neo-Classical period. Throughout the module students will learn to interpret literature by focusing on aspects of its historical (including social and cultural) context, and to consider the interplay between historical background and texts. How does historical change and how do specific historical events impact on the production and reception of literature? What distinguishes imaginative literature from other textual historical documents? Students will also be encouraged to reflect on the academic practice of dividing history into key ‘moments’: the ‘politics’ of periodization, in other words. At what point does one period end and another begin? Why have literary critics chosen to mark the parameters of certain literary-historical periods as they have? While the focus is on English literature, the module will remain sensitive to the interplay between English literary traditions and those in other countries [and the increasingly multicultural dimension of English literary history]. Lectures will introduce students to key features of the literary period in question, to theoretical concepts which have proved useful in historicist approaches to literary criticism, and provide readings of set literary texts from a historical perspective. Seminars will enable students to discuss issues raised in the lectures and secondary reading and their own interpretations of the set texts. By enabling students to gain the critical skills and knowledge required to study literature historically this module will provide a foundation for their study of literature in levels 2 and 3.

Module aims

To help students acquire a knowledge of knowledge of key periods in English literature from the Medieval period to the late Eighteenth Century;

To help students gain critical skills in analyzing literary texts from a historical perspective;

To introduce a range of critical and theoretical approaches useful to literary-historical study;

Analyse critically a varied selection of texts by a range of writers making use of specific reading strategies and theoretical concepts;

Critically assess concepts of literary tradition, canon and periodization;

To help students to think and learn independently, and to manage and organise their time efficiently;

To train students to research and evaluate sources, debates, and ideas, and to communicate their conclusions clearly and accurately in writing;

To enable students to discuss, debate, and exchange complex ideas as part of a group.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
A broad knowledge of some key historical and cultural developments in the chosen literary periods K
A good knowledge of the set primary texts and their historical contexts K
An awareness of how specific works of literature and developments in literary form are influenced by and help shape moments and events in history K
An understanding of key terms and concepts which can be used to analyse literary texts of the period, such as the canon heroic couplets, realism, the novel, neo-classicism K
An awareness of the complexities of literary periodisation in acts of literary criticism and the use of concepts such as ‘tradition', the ‘canon K
The capacity to research, interpret, and evaluate sources, debates, and ideas C
Skills in independent learning and time management T
The ability to structure and communicate complex arguments in writing T
Skills for effective oral communication T

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

 

Indicative content includes:

Week 1: The Politics of Periodization: Literary History

Weeks 2 and 3: Medieval Literature: Chaucer, The Miller’s Tale (1387-1400)

Weeks 4 and 5: Early Modern Literature: selection of poems (e.g. by Raleigh, Spenser, Donne, etc.)*

Weeks 6 and 7: The Restoration: Aphra Behn’s The Rover (1677-1681),

Weeks 8 and 9: The Neo-Classical / Augustan Period: selection of poems (e.g. by Pope, Swift, etc.)*

Weeks 10 and 11: Eighteenth-Century Fiction: Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe

Week 12: a lecture and seminar presenting a retrospective on the module and providing information on assessment and revision.

Methods of Teaching / Learning

 





The learning and teaching strategy is designed to deliver subject knowledge, to develop cognitive/analytical skills, and to develop in-depth transferable, practical and professional skills. Specifically, the weekly lectures deliver subject knowledge related to the historicisation of literature from the Medieval period to the 18th Century, and develop cognitive/analytical skills in analysing, interpreting, and evaluating sources, debates, and ideas within a historical context. The weekly seminars offer student-led discussions that develop skills in communication and in working individually and as a group. The seminars also provide students with instruction on planning and implementing timetables, on conducting research in an organised and critical fashion, and on presenting ideas coherently under time constraint.

This relates to the programme learning and teaching strategy, which, at FHEQ Level 4 students are introduced to subject knowledge through lectures and SurreyLearn and to develop transferable, practical and professional skills, with an introduction to student-led involvement, critical analysis, discussion and rhetorical ability.

The learning and teaching methods include:

 


1-hour lecture per week x 11 weeks
1-hour seminar per week x 11 weeks
3-hour revision session in Week 12


 





 

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of the module learning outcomes.

Seminar discussion with ongoing tutor feedback is designed mainly to assess transferable skills independent learning, time management, the ability to structure and communicate complex arguments in writing and effective oral communication. It also assesses subject knowledge in historical and cultural developments in the chosen literary periods, the set primary texts and their historical contexts, key terminology and literary criticism, and cognitive/analytical skills in researching, interpreting, and evaluating sources, debates, and ideas

Both the essay and the self-evaluative report assess subject knowledge in historical and cultural developments in the chosen literary periods, the set primary texts and their historical contexts, key terminology and literary criticism; cognitive/analytical skills in researching, interpreting, and evaluating sources, debates, and ideas; and transferable skills in independent learning, time management, the ability to structure and communicate complex arguments in writing.

 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:

·         1500-word essay (deadline in Week 14)

·         500-word self-evaluative report (deadline in Week 14)

 

Formative assessment and feedback

·         Seminar Group Presentation (10 mins) with oral tutor feedback at end of session

·         Seminar discussion with ongoing tutor feedback in seminar

 

Students receive verbal feedback on their presentation that informs the final summative essay and self-evaluative report. In addition, all students receive ongong verbal feedback in seminars that informs the final summative asessments.

Reading list

Reading list for HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/eli1018

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.