EARLY MODERN LITERATURE - 2017/8

Module code: ELI2039

Module provider

School of Literature and Languages

Module Leader

WYNNE-DAVIES M Prof (Lit & Langs)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 5

JACs code

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

49

Module Availability

Semester 2

Overall student workload

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework ESSAY (2000 WORDS) 75%
Coursework NEWSPAPER REPORT EXERCISE (500 WORDS) 25%

Alternative Assessment

N/A

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

None.

Module overview

This optional module develops knowledge and skills introduced at Level 4 and gives students a wider and deeper understanding of key material from the Early Modern period of literature in English. There are two key points of continuation from Level 4: first, a sense of historical contextualisation that focuses on important political and intellectual contexts; and second, a generic pathway that covers drama, poetry, and prose. The thematic focus of the module is on identity and the way that the self is constructed and represented through literary discourses. The module also ensures that students have a solid basis for understanding English literature of the Early Modern period. This knowledge will be extended and deepened through optional modules at Levels 5 and 6.

Module aims

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative content includes:

 

Week 1. Topic: The Renaissance I

Text: Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1532)
 
Week 2. Topic: The Renaissance II

Text: Thomas More, Utopia (1516)

Week 3. Topic: The Reformation I

Text: Speeches from the Scaffold, excerpts from Anne Boleyn, Lady Jane Grey, Thomas Cranmer before he's burnt at the stake, excepts from Foxe's Book of Martyrs

Week 4. Topic: The Reformation II

Text: Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus (1592)

Week 5. Topic: The Rise of Capitalism I

Text: William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (1598)
 

Week 6. Employability Week.


Week 7. Topic: The Rise of Capitalism II

Text: Ben Jonson, The Alchemist (1610)

Week 8. Topic: The Private Self I
 Text: Selection of Sonnets (Wyatt, Shakespeare, Lady Mary Wroth)

Week 9. Topic: The Private Self II

Text: Selections of poems by John Donne
 
Week 10. Topic: Towards Modernity I

Text: Francis Bacon, New Atlantis (1627)
 
Week 11. Topic: Towards Modernity II

Text: John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667)

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to deliver subject knowledge, to develop cognitive/analytical skills, and to develop in-depth transferable, practical and professional skills. Specifically, the weekly lectures deliver subject knowledge related to literature and ideas of identity in the Early Modern period and to develop cognitive/analytical skills in using critical material and theoretical concepts in relation to close textual analysis and critical thinking. The weekly seminars offer student-led discussions that develop skills in communication and in working individually and as a group. The seminars also provide students with instruction on planning and implementing timetables, on conducting research in an organised and critical fashion, and on presenting ideas coherently under time constraint.

 

This relates to the programme learning and teaching strategy, which, at FHEQ Level 5, is designed to continue the delivery of subject knowledge through lectures and SurreyLearn and to develop in-depth transferable, practical and professional skills, with a greater emphasis on student-led involvement, critical analysis, discussion and rhetorical ability.

 

The learning and teaching methods include:

 



1-hour lecture per week x 11 weeks


1-hour seminar per week x 11 weeks


3-hour revision session in Week 12


Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of the module learning outcomes.

 

Seminar discussion with ongoing tutor feedback is designed mainly to assess transferable skills in communicating ideas orally and in working individually and in a group. It also assesses subject knowledge in Early Modern literature and ideas of identity as well as theoretical/critical methodologies, and cognitive/analytical skills in using critical material and theoretical concepts in relation to close textual analysis and critical thinking.

 

Both the essay and the exam assess subject knowledge in Early Modern literature and ideas of identity as well as theoretical/critical methodologies; cognitive/analytical skills in in using critical material and theoretical concepts in relation to close textual analysis and critical thinking; transferable skills in communicating ideas in written form, and in planning and implementing timetables for essay deadlines and exam revision. The exam further assesses professional/practical skills, namely the ability to present ideas coherently under time constraint.

 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:



1500-word essay (deadline normally in Week 8)


2-hour exam



 

Formative assessment and feedback



Seminar discussion with ongoing tutor feedback in seminar

 



The deadline for the essay is normally in Week 8. Students receive both written feedback and verbal feedback in tutorials that informs the final summative assessment, i.e. the exam.

Reading list

Reading list for EARLY MODERN LITERATURE : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/eli2039

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.