CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS - 2017/8

Module code: ENG2100

Module provider

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Module Leader

MULHERON MJ Dr (Civl Env Eng)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 5

JACs code

H200

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 1

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 103

Lecture Hours: 24

Tutorial Hours: 11

Laboratory Hours: 32

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Examination EXAMINATION 60%
Coursework COURSEWORK 20%
Practical based assessment LABORATORY WORK 20%

Alternative Assessment

Laboratory Work: Report(s) based on virtual lab class and associated data set.

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

Normal entry requirements for FHEQ Level 5 on a degree course in Civil Engineering. Students taking this module should normally have successfully completed ENG1063 (Materials & Statics) or its equivalent.

Module overview

This module provides an overview of modern construction materials and their use in civil engineering applications. The course focuses on the main material types, e.g. concrete (plain & reinforced), metals (ferrous and non-ferrous), timber and masonry, but also includes engineering polymers, fibre reinforced composites, glass and bituminous materials. The lectures provide an explanation of the composition, manufacture, properties and behaviour of these materials and the hazards and risks they may pose both during construction and subsequent operation of a structure. The concept of micro-structure is reviewed and related to the physical, mechanical, and durability performance of engineering components and structures manufactured from these materials. The problem of “material selection” in considered in relation to:


Material resources (and their financial and environmental costs),
Required performance and design life, and
Environmental exposure and associated overall durability.


This module is supplemented by two laboratory sessions covering the manufacture and testing of fresh and hardened concrete.

Module aims

To provide students with an appreciation of the composition, manufacture, properties and behaviour of a range of engineering materials commonly used in modern Civil Engineering construction. The module will also introduce students to the problem of “material selection” in relation to available material resources (and costs), required design life, environmental exposure and overall durability with the aim of encouraging students to develop, and better integrate, their understanding of the threads of Design, Health & Safety and Sustainability.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Recognise and describe a range of materials commonly used in civil engineering construction and discuss the sustainability issues that might arise from their use. KT
Outline the structure/property relationships for a range of construction and any related hazards and risks and explain their significance for construction practice KCP
Characterise engineering materials in terms of their key physical/mechanical properties and associated durability in different environments. KP
Evaluate likely candidate materials that might be used for a particular application taking account of the competing requirements of design, sustainability and health and safety. KCPT
Undertake the testing of fresh and hardened concrete and interpret the results in terms of the relevant compliance criteria. CPT
Team working
Observation
Technical report writing
Health & Safety – laboratory practice
Critical thinking
Sustainable construction

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Material Resources, Uses and Sustainability:


Classes of engineering materials – properties and typical applications.
Materials supply – resources and reserves.
Design and materials selection criteria – Whole-life issues
Sustainability – embodied energy, CO2 foot print, pollution, reuse, recycling


Engineering Properties of Materials:


Mechanics properties – stress, strain, stiffness, elastic, plastic and vico-elastic behaviour
Property data – Young’s modulus, strength (yield, ultimate, proof), strain capacity
Fracture and failure – yield, stress concentrations, fracture toughness, critical crack size
Time dependent failure – fatigue and creep


Metals and Alloys:


Solidification and microstructure of metals and alloys (Thermal Equilibrium diagrams)
Fabrication methods – casting, rolling, forging, extrusion, drawing, welding, adhesives
Commercial metals – properties, specification and uses
Ferrous metals – Iron (wrought & cast), carbon steels, stainless steel, weathering steel
Non-ferrous metals – aluminium, titanium
Durability and long-term performance including end-of-life recycling


Concrete Technology:


Concrete as a composite material – constituents, mix proportions, sustainability
Properties of fresh concrete – factors controlling and methods of testing
Properties of hardened concrete – factors controlling and methods of testing Dimensional stability and deformation – factors controlling and methods of testing
Concrete mix design methods


Reinforced Concrete:


History, properties and perfromance of reinforced concrete structures
Durability and long-term performance including repair and recycling


Masonry, brick and blockwork:


Bricks and blocks – properties and uses
Mortar types – properties and uses
Construction types – bond styles and properties
Engineering properties, uses and long-term performance including end-of-life recycling


Timber:


The structure of timber – macroscopic, microscopic, molecular
Moisture in timber – Strength, stiffness and toughness
Current uses of timber in construction
Durability and long-term performance including end-of-life recycling


Polymer Materials:


Principal classes of Polymer materials – thermoplastic vs thermoset
Engineering properties, uses and long-term performance including end-of-life recycling


Fibre Reinforced Composites:


Theory of fibre reinforcement – fibre composites
Common fibre reinforcement – glass, carbon, Kevlar
Common matrix systems – epoxy, polyester
FRC engineering properties, applications and long-term performance


Bituminous materials:


Bitumen properties and test methods
Aggregate properties and test methods
Asphalt properties and test methods
Uses in road construction including end-of-life recycling


Glass:


Glass in construction: Production and history
Engineering properties and uses

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The module is based on a series of lectures and integrated tutorial sessions supported by a set of detailed notes. Audio recordings of the content of each learning session (and any associated presentation slides etc) are made available via SurreyLearn to enable individual students to review the material presented and extend their knowledge and understanding using the supplied notes. Students are encouraged to develop an appropriate knowledge-base that they can apply to the main issues relating to the selection and use of construction materials within the context of the (whole-life) design and operation of civil engineering structures. Students are encouraged to apply their existing understanding of sustainable engineering and develop a deeper appreciation of its application within the design of durable infrastructure.

The learning and teaching methods include:


A series of lectures to provide students with an overview of the main issues relating to the properties, uses and long-term performance of construction materials.
A series of tutorial sessions to support the development of ideas explored within the lectures and encourage both peer-to-peer learning and independent enquiry.
A piece of coursework requiring students to undertake an individual case study of a structure and review its design and strcutural form in relation to the materials selection and long-term sustainability.


A set of detailed supporting notes (and references) which students may use to reinforce and deepen their knowledge of the subject and link to other modules in the programme.

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to:

o   Recognise and describe a range of materials commonly used in civil engineering construction and discuss the sustainability issues that might arise from their use. (LO 1)

o   Outline the structure/property relationships for a range of construction and any related hazards and risks and explain their significance for construction practice. (LO 2)

o   Characterise engineering materials in terms of their key physical/mechanical properties and associated durability in different environments. (LO 3)

o   Evaluate candidate materials that might be used for a particular application taking account of the competing requirements of design, sustainability and health and safety. (LO 4)

o   Undertake the testing of fresh and hardened concrete and interpret the results in terms of the relevant compliance criteria. (LO 5)

The summative assessment for this module consists of:


Examination [Learning outcomes: 1-4] (2 hours, 60%)
Coursework: Case study [Learning outcomes:1-4, g-i] (24 hours, 20%)
Laboratory reports on testing fresh concrete (10%) and hardened concrete (10%) [Learning outcomes:5,a-g] (16 hours, 20%)


Formative assessment and feedback

Formative assessment, in the form of a comments and (where appropriate) worked solutions, is provided during the lecture and tutorial sessions. The coursework and laboratory reporting also provide a vehicle for formative written and verbal feedback.

Reading list

Reading list for CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/eng2100

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.