DURABILITY OF BRIDGES AND STRUCTURES - 2017/8

Module code: ENGM033

Module provider

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Module Leader

MULHERON MJ Dr (Civl Env Eng)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 7

JACs code

H200

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 1

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 126

Lecture Hours: 33

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Examination 2 HOUR EXAM 75%
Coursework COURSEWORK 25%

Alternative Assessment

None.

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

Normal entry requirements for FHEQ Level 7. Students should understand basic concepts such as atoms, ions, and electrons, and have an appreciation of the factors that control the properties of construction materials, such as steel and concrete.

Module overview

The module reviews the durability characteristics of the materials used in the construction of modern bridges and engineering structures but focuses on concrete and steel, and their combination as both reinforced and prestressed concrete. The relationship between material behaviour and environment is reviewed and the implications for those tasked with the operation of engineering structures discussed. The various methods for assessing the condition of a structure are explored and linked to the need for viable inspection, maintenance strategies. The course uses a number of case studies to allow the material presented to be placed within its engineering context. The lessons learnt are applied to the problem of the design and construction of new structures.

Module aims

To promote an understanding of the processes leading to the deterioration of construction materials and how they can lead to failure of engineering components and structures.

To describe the methods for testing, monitoring and assessing the condition of concrete and steel structures and the components from which they are constructed.

To review available invasive and non-invasive repair methods and their relative merits when applied to degraded structures within specific exposures

To identify methods for the design, construction and operation of durable structures that take account of both the macro and micro environmental conditions.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Explain the main processes leading to the deterioration of metallic and ceramic construction materials and components and structures built from them. KCP
Specify and undertake viable methods of inspection, testing and monitoring of structures whilst ensuring suitable Health and Safety standards are maintained. KPT
Assess the need for repair of a structure and suggest appropriate invasive or non-invasive repair techniques for degraded metallic, reinforced and prestressed concrete structures         subject to particular exposures. KC
Critically review both existing structures and new designs and identify details likely to influence long-term durability and propose modifications that will reduce the potential for deterioration, facilitate ease of maintenance and reduce on-going costs. KCPT
Planning – time and resources
Observation
Technical report writing
  Health & Safety – site working
Risk identification
Risk mitigation strategies
Critical thinking
Design - “whole-life” thinking

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

The module considers the durability behaviour of concrete and steel structures, and their combination as reinforced and prestressed concrete, although other common engineering materials are also discussed. The self-study learning material is divided into seven (7) main areas (study units). The core topics covered are:


Overview of Durability - Why do materials deteriorate? Whole Life costing. Maintenance strategies.
The Durability of Concrete - What is concrete? Mechanisms responsible for deterioration. Mix design for durability.
The Durability of Metals - Why do metals corrode? Electrochemical aspects of aqueous corrosion. Pourbaix diagrams. Rates of reaction. Forms of metallic corrosion.
The Durability of Reinforced Concrete - Mechanisms of corrosion protection. Factors affecting corrosion of steel in concrete.
Testing and Monitoring Structures - Quality of concrete. Potential for, and extent of, rebar corrosion. Cracks and defects in metallic structures.
Assessment & Repair of Structures - The wait, maintain, repair or demolish decision. Invasive vs non-invasive repair techniques. Cementitious vs polymeric repair systems.
The Design and Construction of Durable Structures - Design for durability. Materials selection. Use of coatings. Electrochemical methods of protection.


This core learning material is extended and supported by a number of case studies of failures of durability and their consequences. The module coursework involves a visual survey, and critical assessment of a local structure to which safe access can be obtained.  

 

 

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The teaching and learning mode is based on a self-study, self-paced, self-learning model. The students are provided with access to a set of structured study notes that contain the learning material, and associated self-check questions, tasks, self-assessment exercises and revision questions. In working through this material the student learning process is supported by a series of weekly keynote-style presentations given by the module co-ordinator. These introduce the main topics covered within each study unit and provide suitable signposts to the material contained within it and establish links to other topics within the module or in other modules. Audio recordings of the content of each keynote session (and any associated presentation slides, discussions, etc) are made available via SurreyLearn to enable individual students (full-time, part-time or distance learning) to review the material presented and reinforce their knowledge and understanding. The self-study material is further illustrated (and extended) by the inclusion of a number of case studies of failures of durability and students are encouraged to consider the implications and applications of these for their own professional lives. The coursework element involves the identification, inspection and assessment of a local structure giving each individual the chance to explore the practical issues of safely accessing a structure. The learning process is further supported by the use of discussion forums using the SurreyLearn environment. This provides an environment within which peer-to-peer discussions and the exchange of ideas and knowledge can occur supported by appropriate tutor-monitoring and direction.

The module seeks to encourage students to develop an appropriate knowledge-base that they can apply to the main issues relating to the appropriate selection and use of construction materials within the context of the (whole-life) design and operation of durable civil engineering structures.

The learning and teaching methods include:


A set of detailed, self-paced, self-study notes (and references) which students use to develop, reinforce and deepen their knowledge of the subject and link to other modules in the programme.
A series of keynote lectures to provide an overview of the main issues relating to the properties, uses and long-term performance of construction materials when applied to the design, construction and operation of durable infrastructure.
Tutorial sessions and on-line discussion forums to support the development of ideas explored within the study material and keynote lectures and encourage both peer-to-peer learning and independent enquiry.
A piece of coursework requiring students to undertake an individual case study of a structure and review its design and structural form in relation to the materials selection and long-term durability.


 

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to:


Explain the main processes leading to the deterioration of metallic and ceramic construction materials and components and structures built from them. (LO 1)
Specify and undertake viable methods of inspection, testing and monitoring of structures whilst ensuring suitable Health and Safety standards are maintained. (LO 2)
Assess the need for repair of a structure and suggest appropriate invasive or non-invasive repair techniques for degraded metallic, reinforced and prestressed concrete structures subject to particular exposures. (LO 3)
Critically review both existing structures and new designs and identify details likely to influence long-term durability and propose modifications that will reduce the potential for deterioration, facilitate ease of maintenance and reduce on-going costs. (LO 4)


The summative assessment for this module consists of:


Examination [Learning outcomes: 1,3,4,g,h] (75%, 2 hours)
Coursework: Case study in two parts


Part 1: Identification of Suitable Structures (5%)

Part 2: Assessment of a Structure. (20%)

Learning outcomes:1,2,4, a-f] (25%, 36 hours)

Formative assessment and feedback

Formative assessment, in the form of a comments and (appropriate) worked solutions, is provided during tutorial and revision sessions. The two pieces of coursework provide a vehicle for both written and verbal formative feedback.

Reading list

Reading list for DURABILITY OF BRIDGES AND STRUCTURES : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/engm033

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.