APPLIED CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES - 2017/8

Module code: SOC2033

Module provider

Sociology

Module Leader

MCGUIRE MR Dr (Sociology)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 5

JACs code

L311

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 2

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 126

Lecture Hours: 11

Seminar Hours: 11

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework 2000 WORD ESSAY 50%
Examination 1 HOUR SEEN EXAM 50%

Alternative Assessment

N/A

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

N/A

Module overview


This module is an introduction to key criminological theories ¿ explaining crime and its causes, patterns of offending and victimisation, and social reactions to crime. The ‘applied’ element of the course title is to situate these theories within specific contexts and practical contexts of society and criminal justice. In other words, the course aims to explore the interplay between theory and practice. The module will cover a number of theoretical developments from ‘classical’ criminological theory onwards, focusing in particular on innovations in the UK and USA since the 20th century interwar period. The module will aim to develop a critical awareness of how theories both contribute to an understanding of criminality as well as shaping and generating ideas and responses to crime and deviance. 

Module aims

Show a critical understanding of the historical development of key criminological and sociological theories of crime and deviance.

Have a critical awareness of the major contentions and arguments between these key traditions.

Be able to apply a range of criminological theories to illuminate contemporary social problems.

Understand the relationship between criminological theory and its impact on social policy and the criminal justice system.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Show a critical understanding of the historical development of key criminological and sociological theories of crime and deviance.
Have a critical awareness of the major contentions and arguments between these key traditions.
Be able to apply a range of criminological theories to illuminate contemporary social problems.
Understand the relationship between criminological theory and its impact on social policy and the criminal justice system.

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content


Indicative content includes:

Week 1: Introduction

Week 2: The Criminal as Pathological Revisited 

Week 3:  Anomie and Strain beyond 1930s America

Week 4: Social Disorganisation

Week 5: Collaborations of Crime

Week 6:  Control Theories

Week 7: Labelling, Stigma and Deviance

Week 8: Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Constructions of Deviance

Week 9: New Deviancy Theory: Repositioning Marxist Criminologies 

Week 10: Crime, Punishment and Neo-Liberal Orders  

Methods of Teaching / Learning


Each session focuses on one major theoretical area of criminological theory. I will advise you of the expectations during the first week of class. My main philosophy which I hope to continue is that with small classes the sessions work best when everyone participates. With this, what I embrace and actively support is for interruptions when I present ideas through the lecture slides. Thoughts and perceptions are fluid and best exchanged in the flow of the class, not strictly confined to the end of me speaking. I do not like delivering a lecture for one hour then having a discussion after – it is a style which I personally find boring for me as I detest the sound of my own voice! So please, read and come to classes prepared, interrupt me, and discuss. Plato would have approved as this was his style of knowledge exchange, so I claim not originality in my approach! 

Assessment Strategy


Formative assessment and feedback

 

Written feedback on essay, general class feedback on exam (posted on SurreyLearn)

Reading list

Reading list for APPLIED CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/soc2033

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.