LAW, SOCIETY & SOCIAL CONTROL - 2017/8

Module code: SOCM026

Module provider

Sociology

Module Leader

MCCARTHY D Dr (Sociology)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 7

JACs code

L311

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 2

Overall student workload

Lecture Hours: 10

Seminar Hours: 10

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework COURSEWORK 100

Alternative Assessment

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

n/a

Module overview

This module explores how law, policing, and community-based modes of social control relate to the institutional and interactional orders of developed Western societies having Common Law jurisdictions. In so doing it examines how individuals and groups seek to influence the behaviours of others and are also subject to regulatory forces that shape their own conduct. It considers the ways that these processes can give rise to crime and social deviance and pre-figure the efforts of agents of social control. Students are encouraged to critically engage with the concept of social control and to reflect on how it illuminates contemporary sociality and our present normative apparatus.

 

Module aims

Have a comprehensive understanding of the dynamic relationships between law, civil society and the State.

Have a developed critical insight into how the various mechanisms of social control are socially and culturally manifested in institutions and social practices.

Have a detailed understanding of complexities involved in studying the wider context of crime and the criminal justice system, and be able to form original connections between these through use of a range of theories and concepts.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Have a comprehensive understanding of the dynamic relationships between law, civil society and the State.
Have a developed critical insight into how the various mechanisms of social control are socially and culturally manifested in institutions and social practices.
Have a detailed understanding of complexities involved in studying the wider context of crime and the criminal justice system, and be able to form original connections between these through use of a range of theories and concepts.

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative content includes:


The concept of social deviance and social control
Histories of social control
Consensus and conflict accounts of normative frameworks
The emergence of law
Determinist, ecological and subcultural aetiologies
Deviancy amplification and the ‘War on Drugs’
The symbiosis of syndicated crime and ‘legitimate’ business
The role of discretion in law enforcement
The ‘appliance of science’ to criminal investigation and detection
Soft control: probation and the ‘what works’ debate
Community control in multi-agency frameworks


 

Methods of Teaching / Learning

2 hour lecture/seminar per week x 11 weeks

 

Students are encouraged to bring their own experiences and perspectives to bear on the topics at hand, both spontaneously and prompted by the lecturer or by other participants. Queries and observations based on out-of-class reading are particularly welcome. This is a subject benefiting from a deep and wide-ranging literature, as well as being prominent in everyday news coverage, and the way to get the most out of the weekly sessions is to embrace this wealth of materials and to thoughtfully relate what one has read to one’s own circumstances and life experience.

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate

1.    A comprehensive understanding of the dynamic relationships between law, civil society and the State.

2.    A developed critical insight into how the various mechanisms of social control are socially and culturally manifested in institutions and social practices.

3.    A detailed understanding of complexities involved in studying the wider context of crime and the criminal justice system, and be able to form original connections between these through use of a range of theories and concepts.

 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:

An essay of 3,000 words. To plan the essay, the last quarter hour of every session is made available for individual students to consult the lecturer. Students are free to use this to discuss their plans for the essay and the lecturer will offer advice. This time can also be used to discuss other relevant matters.

Reading list

Reading list for LAW, SOCIETY & SOCIAL CONTROL : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/socm026

Programmes this module appears in

Programme Semester Classification Qualifying conditions
Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) MSc 2 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module
Criminology and Social Research (Cybercrime and Cybersecurity) MSc 2 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module
Criminology and Social Research MSc 2 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.