CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES - 2017/8

Module code: SOCM032

Module provider

Sociology

Module Leader

SETTY E Miss (Sociology)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 7

JACs code

L611

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 1

Overall student workload

Lecture Hours: 11

Seminar Hours: 11

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting
Coursework COURSEWORK 100

Alternative Assessment

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

N/A

Module overview

Criminology is a historically specific discipline which relies upon a range of theoretical resources to conceptualize ‘crime’, ‘criminals’ and ‘criminality’. This course aims to explore the theoretical resources of criminology in order to think about the discipline not simply a practical activity (as something concerned with the process or administration of criminal justice) but as an activity comprising a distinct epistemology. The module covers the major theoretical developments within criminology and, at the end of the course, asks how they help us elucidate criminal justice problems such as punishment, incarceration and social control.

 

 

Module aims

Have a systematic understanding of the ways in which different theories have sought to understand different types of crime, deviance and control.

Have an advanced ability to make connections and distinctions between these different theories and apply original arguments to assess these.

Have a critical understanding of the ways theories intersect with the politics of crime and the operations of the criminal justice system.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
Have a systematic understanding of the ways in which different theories have sought to understand different types of crime, deviance and control.
Have an advanced ability to make connections and distinctions between these different theories and apply original arguments to assess these.
Have a critical understanding of the ways theories intersect with the politics of crime and the operations of the criminal justice system.

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative content includes:


Week 1 – Crime as Rationality, Crime as Disease
Week 2 – Anomie and Crime
Week 3 – Social Disorganization and Crime
Week 4 – Labelling and Symbolic Interactionism
Week 5 – Control and Rational Choice Theory
Week 6 – Culture and Crime
Week 7 – Reading Week (MSc Conference)
Week 8 - Radical Criminology
Week 9 – Feminist Criminology
Week 10 - Post-Structuralism and the Legacy of Foucault
Week 11 - Punishment and Late Modernity


 

 

Methods of Teaching / Learning

2 hour lecture/seminar per week x 11 weeks

My main philosophy which I hope to continue is that with small classes the sessions work best when everyone participates. With this, what I embrace and actively support is for interruptions when I present ideas through the lecture slides. Thoughts and perceptions are fluid and best exchanged in the flow of the class, not strictly confined to the end of me speaking. I do not like delivering a lecture for one hour then having a discussion after – it is a style which I personally find boring for me as I detest the sound of my own voice! So please, read and come to classes prepared, interrupt me, and discuss. Plato would have approved as this was his style of knowledge exchange, so I claim no originality in my approach!

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate

• A systematic understanding of the ways in which different theories have sought to understand different types of crime, deviance and control.

• An advanced ability to make connections and distinctions between these different theories and apply original arguments to assess these.

• A critical understanding of the ways theories intersect with the politics of crime and the operations of the criminal justice system.

 

Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:

An essay plan which will be marked and given comments on content and academic rigour (ungraded), and an essay of 3,000 words (graded). Comments will be given in writing to students.

Reading list

Reading list for CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/socm032

Programmes this module appears in

Programme Semester Classification Qualifying conditions
Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) MSc 1 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module
Criminology and Social Research (Cybercrime and Cybersecurity) MSc 1 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module
Criminology and Social Research MSc 1 Core Each unit of assessment must be passed at 50% to pass the module

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.