CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN VETERINARY MEDICINE - EMERGING DISEASES, PUBLIC HEALTH AND SUSTAINABILITY - 2017/8

Module code: VMS4004

Module provider

School of Veterinary Medicine

Module Leader

DEL RIO VILAS V Dr (Vet Med)

Number of Credits

15

ECT Credits

7.5

Framework

JACs code

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 2

Overall student workload

Assessment pattern

Assessment type Unit of assessment Weighting

Alternative Assessment

In exceptional circumstances, the Report could be replaced by an additional essay and the strategy document by a presentation to a small invited audience

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

N/A

Module overview

Students will develop their understanding of the repercussions of animal health, beyond the individual animal or enterprise to the sector, regional, national and global levels. They will further their knowledge of the responsibility of the veterinary profession in relation to the interactions between animals and human society. This will equip them to participate and lead in multi-disciplinary approaches to preventive veterinary medicine. The module will include encouraging debate on contemporary issues such as the emergence of new infectious disease, the contribution of livestock to climate change, food security and the global population and the alleviation of poverty. The focus will equally be upon the impact on animal welfare and human wellbeing. It will encompass the role of international surveillance of animal health to detect new threats to animal or human wellbeing.  Our students will be able to provide rational and scientific evidence to address global one health issues. In doing so, our students will be instilled with the concepts behind the “One Health” philosophy: “To diminish the risk and minimize the global impact of epidemics and pandemics due to emerging infectious disease …… improving public health, food safety and security and the livelihoods of poor farming communities as well as protecting the health of ecosystems”. During the module, students will learn about the role of Governmental and Non-Governmental Organisations in influencing and implementing policy.

Module aims

Challenge students to confront contemporary issues from their professional role

Stimulate self-directed research across various media for evidence on selected topics

Encourage students to use reasoned argument to debate issues in groups and achieve a consensus

Appreciate the diversity of views amongst stakeholders concerning a topic and develop an awareness of how these groups may either seek to influence others or respond to such external influences

Express authoritative views in a cogent manner for different and non-specialist audiences in a professional manner

Engender a trans-disciplinary approach to decision-making in these areas

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed

Attributes Developed

C - Cognitive/analytical

K - Subject knowledge

T - Transferable skills

P - Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative content includes:


Animals, trade, people and welfare – the economic drivers behind globalisation
Food security and population growth
Climate change and animals
The role of animals in sustainable livelihoods and poverty alleviation
One Health:

Measuring global health and detecting emerging threats, including antimicrobial resistance
Seeking integrated solutions
Evaluating outcomes


Leadership and influence: who decides and what is the role of the veterinary profession?
Starting at home: contentious issues in Europe today

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The learning and teaching strategy is designed to:

Promote independent learning and the assimilation of evidence to form judgements in the face of contentious and complex problems. Develop team-working skills where a negotiated consensus is created from differing viewpoints. Evaluate evidence and present influential arguments. Create an awareness of and respect for the opinions of others, including those from a non-scientific background. Encourage students to consider the One Health impact of their decisions in their professional lives.

The learning and teaching methods include:


Lectures, seminars & small group discussion
Self-directed learning including literature reviews and group debate on contentious issues
Practicals involving computer-based exercises handling and evaluating data and surveillance evidence
Student-led discussions, including interactions with students in other countries
Problem-based learning exercises and group presentations


There are a total of 30 hours of lectures, seminars and small group discussions, 30 hours of practicals and 90 hours of guided study including PBL. The module will include invitations to visitors, including people from Government and NGO’s and will aim to build upon the School’s international links.

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate


Their ability to evaluate evidence and debate contemporary issues
The analysis and interpretation of global surveillance data
Group working and writing ability plus the ability to synthesis knowledge and make recommendations through a report on hazards associated with a farm open day
The formulation of a rational strategy to address a current contentious issue
Their contribution to peer learning through PBL exercises
Their understanding of the global risks from the emergence of new threats to animal and human health through a written essay


Thus, the summative assessment for this module consists of:


A report offering an evaluation of presented surveillance data relating to a potential epidemic (40%)
Contribution to peer learning, including debate participation– (10%)
Viewpoint campaign – a contemporary and contentious issue will be presented (eg badgers and TB, industrial livestock farming). Students will role play different stakeholders (eg consumer, farmer, journalist, food business operators) or experts (eg vet scientist, ethicist, environmentalist) and create a campaign to support their viewpoint using web media eg wiki’s. The vet school community will be their audience and at the end of the campaign, there will be an opportunity for the audience to vote on two or more options created by the students  (50%)


Formative assessment and feedback

Formative feedback will be provided through verbal feedback in practical sessions and following guided learning exercises with summative self-assessment exercises

Reading list

Reading list for CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN VETERINARY MEDICINE - EMERGING DISEASES, PUBLIC HEALTH AND SUSTAINABILITY : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/vms4004

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.